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Academic subject requests
#11
Mad Mosquito, I'm new to the Mosquito community, and just finished the build of my XE285 at the factory. I look forward to meeting you. Dwight and I recently had a discussion about how many people are out there flying without a license or other required paperwork. Yes, it is happening, and largely in uncontrolled airspace. But, IMO, to recommend violating the law in a public forum is irresponsible.

Dick
XE285 #1329 N869DJ
Start: June 2018
Done:  Sep 12, 2018  Sleepy 
AWC Issued: Sep 26, 2018  Big Grin  
Reply
#12
(09-15-2018, 01:16 PM)Mad Mosquito Wrote: Casey,

You are right on target with everything you said. I didn't realize that a place like Jerry Trimble was offering the PPL-H course for right around $11k. I have been out of the FAA side of instructing for several years now so I guess I need to bone up on what the latest info is if I'm going to be engaging in discussions here. I need to get myself a current FAR/AIM and do some reading. The MZ 202 has proven to be a little problematic but it's really the only option for those who are on a budget and/or can't get a medical and must go the ultralight route. If you have the time and money to get a PPL-H and can go with the XE285 then that is a great plan. So, where are you in the process? Did you start training already? Are you training with Jerry Trimble in Smithville, TX? Did you already order a Mosquito? I look forward to seeing your progress so please share your experiences with us here on the forum. I'd be happy to help you out with anything that stumps you so hit me up in a thread or a PM. Good luck with your training and fulfilling your dream.

Thanks for the kind words Mark! I have started my training, I'm sitting at about 12 hours of student time atm, took a 2hr lesson this past Saturday to make up the previous two weeks of  having to miss lessons due to work and weather. I'm sooooo close to being able to land an Enstrom F28C! I can handle the approach unassisted, but at the bottom of the descent I'm still having trouble bringing all 4 axis of controls in together to pull us into a hover. I find I'm not adding enough power to get up to 30"/Hg to hold a hover...but considering that in my previous session I couldn't even enter the descent properly I'm just super excited to be making progress!  Big Grin  It's soooo stressful but at the same time its the most fun I've had with my clothes on!

I've been flying helicopters in game and simulators religiously since I was a wee lad. So I knew enough when I set out this was going to be an extremely difficult thing to accomplish, and I was right haha. But that feeling that I got when I finally could just fly a helicopter around the countryside without my instructor's assistance to help us gain altitude again after I had let us descend 200' and didn't quite have the skill to adjust the collective/throttle enough to put us back into a climb was just the greatest thing in the world!

Now I'm looking forward to being able to take off and land and I'm soooo close haha! I love it!

And I'm taking my training with a little father/son owned company in Danburry, TX called Salaika Aviation, I've had an awesome time with Tim and TJ Salaika, truly great peeps and I can't recommend them enough!


Gonna attach a picture here from the weekend...we'll see if it works haha

[Image: 42044988_1937811249611689_65429497255726...e=5C1CA93E]




*edit* okay well I guess there's no easy way to add pictures...

*second edit* Okay nevermind, that time it worked!


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
"Into the fires of forever we will fly through the heavens
With the power of the universe we stand strong together
Through the force in our power, it will soon reach the hour
For victory we ride, Fury of the Storm!" 
Reply
#13
(09-17-2018, 02:28 PM)Dick Campbell Wrote: Mad Mosquito, I'm new to the Mosquito community, and just finished the build of my XE285 at the factory.  I look forward to meeting you.  Dwight and I recently had a discussion about how many people are out there flying without a license or other required paperwork.  Yes, it is happening, and largely in uncontrolled airspace.  But, IMO, to recommend violating the law in a public forum is irresponsible.

Dick

Dick, 

Welcome to the Mosquito Nation and thanks for your input. I hope you don't think I'm advocating that anyone fly anything illegally. It has been several years since I was last really involved in the Mosquito website and therefore the community at large. At that time, I'm pretty sure there were some people flying experimental class Mosquitos with a sport pilot's license. I thought that was legal but never really looked into it since it didn't affect me. I have a commercial helicopter and a CFII helicopter and was flying an ultralight Mosquito XEL so I was covered from all angles. I guess I was waaaaay overqualified to be flying the XEL! LOL. I was either wrong about what I had heard (probably) or something has changed to prevent helis from being flown under the sport pilot class license while I was out of contact (maybe). I'll have to talk to some people who know the history to get that cleared up. I'll be sure to let you all know the truth and to let you know if the crow needs more seasoning or not. Thanks for already proving to be a good ambassador for the community. I look forward to your build and flying progress.

(09-17-2018, 03:39 PM)Casey Wrote:
(09-15-2018, 01:16 PM)Mad Mosquito Wrote: Casey,

You are right on target with everything you said. I didn't realize that a place like Jerry Trimble was offering the PPL-H course for right around $11k. I have been out of the FAA side of instructing for several years now so I guess I need to bone up on what the latest info is if I'm going to be engaging in discussions here. I need to get myself a current FAR/AIM and do some reading. The MZ 202 has proven to be a little problematic but it's really the only option for those who are on a budget and/or can't get a medical and must go the ultralight route. If you have the time and money to get a PPL-H and can go with the XE285 then that is a great plan. So, where are you in the process? Did you start training already? Are you training with Jerry Trimble in Smithville, TX? Did you already order a Mosquito? I look forward to seeing your progress so please share your experiences with us here on the forum. I'd be happy to help you out with anything that stumps you so hit me up in a thread or a PM. Good luck with your training and fulfilling your dream.

Thanks for the kind words Mark! I have started my training, I'm sitting at about 12 hours of student time atm, took a 2hr lesson this past Saturday to make up the previous two weeks of  having to miss lessons due to work and weather. I'm sooooo close to being able to land an Enstrom F28C! I can handle the approach unassisted, but at the bottom of the descent I'm still having trouble bringing all 4 axis of controls in together to pull us into a hover. I find I'm not adding enough power to get up to 30"/Hg to hold a hover...but considering that in my previous session I couldn't even enter the descent properly I'm just super excited to be making progress!  Big Grin  It's soooo stressful but at the same time its the most fun I've had with my clothes on!

I've been flying helicopters in game and simulators religiously since I was a wee lad. So I knew enough when I set out this was going to be an extremely difficult thing to accomplish, and I was right haha. But that feeling that I got when I finally could just fly a helicopter around the countryside without my instructor's assistance to help us gain altitude again after I had let us descend 200' and didn't quite have the skill to adjust the collective/throttle enough to put us back into a climb was just the greatest thing in the world!

Now I'm looking forward to being able to take off and land and I'm soooo close haha! I love it!

And I'm taking my training with a little father/son owned company in Danburry, TX called Salaika Aviation, I've had an awesome time with Tim and TJ Salaika, truly great peeps and I can't recommend them enough!


Gonna attach a picture here from the weekend...we'll see if it works haha

[Image: 42044988_1937811249611689_65429497255726...e=5C1CA93E]




*edit* okay well I guess there's no easy way to add pictures...

*second edit* Okay nevermind, that time it worked!

Casey,

Man, those are some great looking pieces of chinery! I really loved flying the Enstroms and you are learning in a really great machine. Stable in the hover (like a Mosquito) with a powerful tail rotor (like a Mosquito). As far as the hovering at the end of an approach, well, there is a lot going on there all at once. The important thing to remember is that the "in ground effect" hovering part at the end of the approach is exactly like hovering before you take off. The problem is all the changes that the helicopter goes through making you feel like it's not the same helicopter when you get back to the hover. Transverse Flow Effect (TFE) is the biggest culprit of confusion just like when taking off so study TFE until you know it well enough to explain it. That may help you when you are flying but by the time you really understand TFE you will have probably already learned to fly the helicopter anyway. Most pilots know that TFE exists but they can't really explain it. If you have any problems understanding TFE let me know here on the open forum and I'll go into it for the benefit of all.
Mark Thompson
Reply
#14
Hi Mark, much appreciate an experienced instructor like yourself willing to share their knowledge on the forum, and combine it with their Mosquito knowledge. I am another new Mosquito builder/owner located way down in New Zealand. Just like Casey above I am currently training, at 15hrs now, 14 in a Cabri and 1 in a R22 to try something different. Looking forward to seeing more great info in this academic section.
Gary
XE285
Reply
#15
Understand Mark. Helicopters can be either registered or ultralight, but excluded from light sport category. Unfortunately, when I was looking to buy, the only craft available were non-registered non-ultralight qualified birds. But in retrospect I’m glad I built my own and will have it certificated. I can also get the repairman license and I will really understand my bird.
XE285 #1329 N869DJ
Start: June 2018
Done:  Sep 12, 2018  Sleepy 
AWC Issued: Sep 26, 2018  Big Grin  
Reply
#16
I hear ya Mark! I will certainly do some more reading regarding TFE! I think one of the things that also isn't really helping matters is that my training started with just learning to control the helicopter at 400', doing turns and holding altitude, then we immediately went into learning landings....I mean I haven't even hovered a helicopter yet and my instructor is teaching me how to descend down and terminate to a hover and I'm just like "omg omg I'm learning how to do two very difficult things here all at once!" lol, I mean maybe I should say something to my instructor...but I guess I kind of just figured he knows what he's doing, and I figured just from the fact that I am progressing means that whatever he's doing is working for me haha, so we'll just see how the next few lessons go.



But hey Mark I thought of an academic discussion we could talk about that maybe you could help out with!

So, the Enstrom being a turbo-charged piston engine, not only must engine and rotor RPM's be managed closely, but so must manifold pressure as well. You must be sure not to overboost the engine.

Now my instructor was saying that with my Mosi being a non-turbo engine, that it would be good because I could basically pull all the power the engine has during a hover, which got me kind of thinking about how the XE285 works.

So the Inntec 800 engine, offers something like 160HP at 8,300 RPMs, but for our Mosquitos, we derate that engine to like 80HP at 6,000 RPM. So my question is, if this engine can theoretically output so much more power, do I have to monitor engine RPMs in a Mosi like I do in an Enstrom? I mean since the engine can go all the way up to 8,300 RPM, it seems to me like any engine speed I need to maintain rotor RPMs, the engine can provide and not even come near a danger area(one might even say....DANGA ZONE!). In turn meaning the only RPM I should have to worry about is my rotor RPM. Or is there an aspect of this equation I'm not taking into account here? This is all sooo  new to me haha.
"Into the fires of forever we will fly through the heavens
With the power of the universe we stand strong together
Through the force in our power, it will soon reach the hour
For victory we ride, Fury of the Storm!" 
Reply
#17
(09-18-2018, 09:47 PM)Casey Wrote: I hear ya Mark! I will certainly do some more reading regarding TFE! I think one of the things that also isn't really helping matters is that my training started with just learning to control the helicopter at 400', doing turns and holding altitude, then we immediately went into learning landings....I mean I haven't even hovered a helicopter yet and my instructor is teaching me how to descend down and terminate to a hover and I'm just like "omg omg I'm learning how to do two very difficult things here all at once!" lol, I mean maybe I should say something to my instructor...but I guess I kind of just figured he knows what he's doing, and I figured just from the fact that I am progressing means that whatever he's doing is working for me haha, so we'll just see how the next few lessons go.



But hey Mark I thought of an academic discussion we could talk about that maybe you could help out with!

So, the Enstrom being a turbo-charged piston engine, not only must engine and rotor RPM's be managed closely, but so must manifold pressure as well. You must be sure not to overboost the engine.

Now my instructor was saying that with my Mosi being a non-turbo engine, that it would be good because I could basically pull all the power the engine has during a hover, which got me kind of thinking about how the XE285 works.

So the Inntec 800 engine, offers something like 160HP at 8,300 RPMs, but for our Mosquitos, we derate that engine to like 80HP at 6,000 RPM. So my question is, if this engine can theoretically output so much more power, do I have to monitor engine RPMs in a Mosi like I do in an Enstrom? I mean since the engine can go all the way up to 8,300 RPM, it seems to me like any engine speed I need to maintain rotor RPMs, the engine can provide and not even come near a danger area(one might even say....DANGA ZONE!). In turn meaning the only RPM I should have to worry about is my rotor RPM. Or is there an aspect of this equation I'm not taking into account here? This is all sooo  new to me haha.

Casey
Since the drive train is direct drive there is no way to use a different rpm without changing the gearing. If you increase the engine rpm the rotor rpm will go up also. If it doesn’t you have some sort of slippage either clutch, sprag or a belt giving up. The only thing that changes is the amount of throttle you are applying to maintain the 6000 rpm. 
Joncy
Reply
#18
Hey Casey, some things to think about with the XE285 engine (as I have thought about these too building my own), the motor isn't actually derated, in its original snowmobile setup it would only make about that same horsepower at 6000rpm as in our installs (we would have a different exhaust that would influence the max output a bit). The motor would have originally opened exhaust powervalves (in 2 stages, the first being at 6000), and that would have given it a big surge in power high in the rev range. We dont use the powervalves, so the motor power should be a lot more sedate in its power delivery if revs climb.

As far as controlling that rpm, and the motor rpm and rotor rpm work together so I would think you focus on the rotor rpm. The only time motor rpm should go higher would be some sort of mechanical failure like the centrifugal clutch for example, when rolling off throttle and emergency landing training would come into play.

Gary
Reply
#19
(09-18-2018, 07:26 PM)grevis Wrote: Hi Mark, much appreciate an experienced instructor like yourself willing to share their knowledge on the forum, and combine it with their Mosquito knowledge. I am another new Mosquito builder/owner located way down in New Zealand.  Just like Casey above I am currently training, at 15hrs now, 14 in a Cabri and 1 in a R22 to try something different.  Looking forward to seeing more great info in this academic section.
Gary
XE285

Welcome Gary! I would love to fly that Cabri!

(09-18-2018, 08:43 PM)Dick Campbell Wrote: Understand Mark.  Helicopters can be either registered or ultralight, but excluded from light sport category.  Unfortunately, when I was looking to buy,  the only craft available were non-registered non-ultralight qualified birds.  But in retrospect I’m glad I built my own and will have it certificated.  I can also get the repairman license and I will really understand my bird.
Good for you Dick! Getting that repair man's certificate is gold. Not because of the money but for the conscience. Are you an H-60 pilot as well?

(09-18-2018, 09:47 PM)Casey Wrote: I hear ya Mark! I will certainly do some more reading regarding TFE! I think one of the things that also isn't really helping matters is that my training started with just learning to control the helicopter at 400', doing turns and holding altitude, then we immediately went into learning landings....I mean I haven't even hovered a helicopter yet and my instructor is teaching me how to descend down and terminate to a hover and I'm just like "omg omg I'm learning how to do two very difficult things here all at once!" lol, I mean maybe I should say something to my instructor...but I guess I kind of just figured he knows what he's doing, and I figured just from the fact that I am progressing means that whatever he's doing is working for me haha, so we'll just see how the next few lessons go.



But hey Mark I thought of an academic discussion we could talk about that maybe you could help out with!

So, the Enstrom being a turbo-charged piston engine, not only must engine and rotor RPM's be managed closely, but so must manifold pressure as well. You must be sure not to overboost the engine.

Now my instructor was saying that with my Mosi being a non-turbo engine, that it would be good because I could basically pull all the power the engine has during a hover, which got me kind of thinking about how the XE285 works.

So the Inntec 800 engine, offers something like 160HP at 8,300 RPMs, but for our Mosquitos, we derate that engine to like 80HP at 6,000 RPM. So my question is, if this engine can theoretically output so much more power, do I have to monitor engine RPMs in a Mosi like I do in an Enstrom? I mean since the engine can go all the way up to 8,300 RPM, it seems to me like any engine speed I need to maintain rotor RPMs, the engine can provide and not even come near a danger area(one might even say....DANGA ZONE!). In turn meaning the only RPM I should have to worry about is my rotor RPM. Or is there an aspect of this equation I'm not taking into account here? This is all sooo  new to me haha.
Casey,

I don't think I know who your instructor is but I agree with him 100%! He's teaching you how to "fly" the helicopter first because "flying" a helicopter is the easy part. Hovering is the hardest part so why would you want to do that first? Did you learn to walk before you crawled? Learning to control the helicopter in all phases of flight is the end state so let your instructor do what he do and you will be doing all of it before you know it. If you learned to hover first, you would increase the amount of time and money you would spend learning to fly and getting your PPL not to mention increasing you frustration level. All that said, TFE is what is kicking your butt at the bottom of the approaches and I've got a secret for you; "your instructor knows this!" Don't fret brother, you will be hovering rock solid before you know it.

I read the other replies below and they all answer your 285 rpm/power question very well so I will not muddy the waters with more redundancy. Bottom line is that engine has plenty of torque to keep that rotor at 100%  even when you are operating at high DA.
Mark Thompson
Reply
#20
Mark - I flew A-6s in the USMC. Only started flying helos when I retired over a year ago. I have a little over 70 hours in the R22 to date.

I'm strictly a recreational pilot now, and helos are a blast.
XE285 #1329 N869DJ
Start: June 2018
Done:  Sep 12, 2018  Sleepy 
AWC Issued: Sep 26, 2018  Big Grin  
Reply


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