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Cruise Speed
#1
I am still in the learning phase about these helicopters.  I think I have watched just about every youtube video I could find.  (wish there were more)  I don't think I have seen anyone go over 70mph in their mosquito.  I mostly see 40's and 50's with the occasional 60mph.  I know the Vne is 95 on the 285 and 100+ on the XET.  Does anyone cruise at 75 to 85 mph?  I have watched a few Helicycle videos and those have indicated 90 to 95 mph with a 110 Vne.  Is it just not comfortable at those speeds?  Please enlighten me.

Travis
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#2
Following!
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#3
Actually, Vne on the 285 is 100 mph (same as the XET I think), and while the XE Vne is published at 90, it probably also could be 100 since Vne is primarily a function of the rotor design, and all three models share the same drive train.

I have cruised above 80, but it just seems more comfortable (to me) at 70-80. I'd prefer to stay away from 90+ because I don't want to find out what Vne feels like. And besides, this is not a cross country bird, it's for flying around and taking in the scenery, why be in a rush?
XE285 #1329 N869DJ
Start: June 2018
Done:  Sep 12, 2018  Sleepy 
AWC Issued: Sep 26, 2018  Big Grin  
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#4
Dick,

Well stated! I putts around at about 60. To me it is all about not being "Ground Slime" (what we in the hang gliding community called non-flyers) and being able to take off and land from my property, roll it into my garage and avoid renting expensive hangar space at an airport!

Michael
XE 285  1205 (Myrtle)
Start: 8/1/2013
Finish: 5/24/2014
Arrived home: 10/11/2014
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#5
TkTrevoR, This is a good question! I'm not 100% sure but if my memory serves me correctly, I think I remember hearing in a conversation at the CFX factory (2018 factory fly-in) that the VNE as a overall design is set at 120mph(?). Possible calculated number, don't know if Dwight has inflight verified that or not. LOL!!! I think that number is set with dissymmetry of lift and RBS (retreating blade stall) in mind along with the instability as you approach RBS. I think I've heard the XE's start getting a little squirrelly at about 110mph. I have heard there are XET guys that will cruise around the 105mph range.
I would think the VNE's that are listed for the XE/XEL of 90mph, XE285 of 100mph and the XET not listing a VNE but lists "Max Air Speed" of 100+mph, would be more from power availably. It's never a good idea to run any helicopter at 100% power continuously. With that in mind I can see listed VNE's as 60hp=90mph, 85hp=100mph and 95hp would equal "100+mph".

You titled this thread "Cruise Speed". With any helicopter, just like an airplane, there are cruise power settings for continuous use. I do know that once you hit that happy cruise setting, the power required past that point is on an exponential curve. Your fuel flow vs airspeed will directly show you where that is. Fuel is power! Once you hit that point, for an increase in 10% speed, you may increase your fuel consumption by 20-30%. SO, how hard do you want to push your engine and mainly, how high do you want your GPH to be?
You mentioned the Helicycle. The Helicycle (500lbs empty weight) uses the Solar T-62-32 which is a larger engine (150shp) that pulls approximately 4-5 GPH more than the XET's (420lbs empty weight) Solar T62-2A1 (95shp) for a direct comparison. The Helicycle lists a cruise of 95mph and max air speed of 110mph. The XET cruise is anywhere from 40-ish to 90-ish with a max air speed of 100+mph. This spring I'm gonna try and map out my speed vs fuel consumption and list my cruise speeds with gph.

I hope this helps your question. I tried not to ramble. LOL...
Dave Storey
XET/N72SX
storeyaviation.com
http://storeyaviation.com/
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#6
Thanks for the replies so far as I am looking for actual practical performance numbers vs what is listed on a sheet. Michael's experience is mostly what I see on youtube videos (when I can actually see the airspeed indicator). And most of the videos are hovering and a few appear to be short trips. I come from the airplane world and most of my flying is local with the occasional 1 or 2 x-country's around the state. I cruise at 110mph in my plane. I was just trying to figure if it would still be feasible at the slower speeds of 75 or 80 but when I looked at videos it appeared than number to be around 50 or 60 instead.

I did not realize the turbine in the helicycle was more powerful. Power=speed makes sense. In my reasearch so far I have come to realize that the experimental helicopter community is very small and to get the extra seat costs about 3 or 4 times as much.

Travis
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#7
A lot of the video's on YouTube are the XE and XEL with the smaller engine and will have the slower cruise speeds. Since 2002. The latest version, the XE285 is definitely faster and has way less video's out on YouTube (especially that show the speed) but should be growing as more of these models get built.

Haha, yes! The cost of that extra seat is very expensive.

If ya get the chance, try to come down to the CFX factory fly-in March 28-29th in Trenton FL. It'll be a nice warmer wx vacation for ya and every model will be represented there with plenty of personnel to answer and questions.
Dave Storey
XET/N72SX
storeyaviation.com
http://storeyaviation.com/
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#8
Travis, I am also in a partnership of a Grumman Cheetah. This is my cross country bird. The Mosquito is definitely NOT a cross country aircraft. It is a fun to fly, buzz around low altitude, enjoy the scenery, and practice your helo skills. Consider that it has no trim, no stability and little inertia. You are constantly flying the controls and you cannot ever let go of either of them (think R-22). An hour's worth of flying is a real workout because you cannot relax. Just trying to set your expectations.
XE285 #1329 N869DJ
Start: June 2018
Done:  Sep 12, 2018  Sleepy 
AWC Issued: Sep 26, 2018  Big Grin  
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#9
(02-05-2020, 02:42 AM)Dick Campbell Wrote: The Mosquito is definitely NOT a cross country aircraft.  It is a fun to fly, buzz around low altitude, enjoy the scenery, and practice your helo skills.

Yup, Mr. Campbell gets it!
I too have a fixed wing for the x-country stuff. The heli is also a great way to get to and from the airport, pancake breakfasts, EAA meetings and great BBQ restaurants that have a field next to it.
Just saying...
Dave Storey
XET/N72SX
storeyaviation.com
http://storeyaviation.com/
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#10
The XEL flies with floats creating more drag and load on the rotor. The Vne is therefore lower for XEL even though the rotor design is the same.
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